2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

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2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

Every one of us is capable of aggressive acts, but we differ in our likelihood of exhibiting aggression under comparable circumstances.  Individual differences in aggressiveness result from a combination of genetic and environmental influences, but where...  >> MORE

2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

Evolutionary and ecological theory suggests that the best behavioral strategy can change when competitors are present.  In agreement with this theory, the aggressive, territorial, and foraging behaviors of many animals are regulated by population density.  We hypothesize that population density...  >> MORE

2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

Violent criminal behavior (VCB) is a major societal problem with a poorly understood etiology. Many criminological and sociological studies document an important etiologic role for environmental adversities. A few twin and...  >> MORE

2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

The emotional and health-related costs of violence in human societies is enormous.  As in humans, the extent and pattern of aggressive behaviors differ between the sexes of most species.  Males and females of most animals display aggression under specific social situations.  Male mice mark their...  >> MORE

2012 Senior Scholar Award in Neuroscience

Behaviors such as aggression, fear, and mating are highly conserved across evolution. Their proper regulation and display is essential for fitness and survival. Surprisingly, the precise subset of neurons in the brain that generate each of these survival behaviors have not been discovered,...  >> MORE