2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

<< Previous year | Next year >>
2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging
Aging occurs in almost all organisms, yet the molecular basis of aging is poorly understood. In addition, many diseases, including cancers, occur much more frequently in aged populations. Therefore, an understanding of the molecular and cellular events that accompany aging would undoubtedly...  >> MORE
2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

The aging of an organism is determined by its genetic background and is influenced by environmental inputs. Genetically, aging is considered to be a polygenic process; however, studies in model systems revealed mutations in single loci that extend life span. The best established epigenetic...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

We are studying effects of genes and hormones on aging. We have shown that mutant mice with inherited deficiency of several pituitary hormones live much longer than their normal siblings. These mutants, the Ames dwarf mice, maintain their health, learning abilities, and memory until late in life...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

Telomeres are specialized capping structures on chromosomes that play important roles in aging, cancer and genome stability. Normal cells do not possess the specialized enzyme telomerase that functions to synthesize and maintain telomere length with each cell division. Thus, cell division is...  >> MORE


Dr. Jeff W. Lichtman

Harvard University


Dr. Joshua R. Sanes

Harvard University

Time Lapse Imaging of Neurons as They Age

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

That the adult nervous system changes with age is beyond dispute: cognitive abilities deteriorate, reflexes worsen, and the incidence of neurodegenerative disease skyrockets. Yet, despite major advances in our understanding of the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, the neural underpinnings...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is invariably associated with reduced neurological function. Moreover, the incidence of acute neurodegenerative disease strongly increases with age. As the average lifespan lengthens due to improvements in medicine and public health, the incidence of devastating neurodegenerative diseases...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

Normal cells grown in culture have a limited potential to divide and eventually become terminally non-dividing. This is called cell or replicative senescence and is used as a model to study aging at the cell level. Tumor-derived cells, in contrast, divide constantly without control. We have...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

One of the most widely accepted theories in aging research is the free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging, which states that a steady-state accumulation of oxidative damage in cells and tissues leads to aging. Over the past two decades, it has been shown that oxidative damage to cells...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging
Modern societies are the beneficiaries of a previous century of extraordinary acceleration of advances in science and medicine. Yet, there is still a significant burden of disease and illness. One reason for the persistence of sickness and poor health is that, despite extensive knowledge of human...  >> MORE
2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

The aging process is increasingly considered to be a programmed event regulated by individual gene products, like other developmental processes. One major implication of this working model is that several diseases associated with aging might actually be linked by a common set of aging genes...  >> MORE

2003 Senior Scholar Award in Aging

The biological processes that cause human aging are complex and remain poorly understood. Two general mechanisms have been proposed to explain the aging of human tissue. The first postulates that aging is caused by the accumulated damage that cells within our tissues sustain due to various...  >> MORE