2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Cellular aging is the dynamic process of accumulating genetic and molecular changes in cells. A variety of diseases, such as cancer, type-2 diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease, are linked to aging. Of the approximately 150,000 people who die everyday in the world, two thirds die of age-related...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Hormonal signals released by neurons affect our moods, emotions, and appetites. As a consequence, mood disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes can be caused by defects in neuronal hormone release. Many of these disorders have an age-...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The aging brain has a decreased ability to lay down new memories, and this decrease is exacerbated in diseases of aging such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. This cognitive decline is not only due to the death of neurons, but also during aging there is a loss of neuronal connections called...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

In the United States, only about one person in 5,000 achieves an age of 100 years or more. Demographers and epidemiologists have estimated that the length of human lifespan is a moderately heritable trait, with the offspring of individuals achieving old age being more likely to also achieve old...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is characterized by a progressive functional decline in many organs. Understanding the changes that cause this decline and identifying therapeutic manipulations that can delay or revert these deleterious effects of age are some of the fundamental goals of aging research. The long term...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The accumulation of misfolded proteins contributes to many diseases, ranging from disorders of the eye to neurodegeneration. These protein misfolding and aggregation diseases are strongly associated with aging, suggesting that older cells are unable to effectively clear damaged proteins....  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The Cang lab is interested in developing novel biophotonics tools to understand chromatin modifications in cellular senescence. The human genome is organized into chromatin, a complex of DNA and associated proteins, to fit inside a micrometer-sized nucleus. The structure of chromatin determines...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging phenotypes and aging-related diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disease. Healthy, functioning mitochondria require the coordinated expression of genes located on both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes....  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and mass (sarcopenia) is a serious feature of aging and a key component of the geriatric syndrome of frailty. Epidemiological surveys in humans indicate that muscle aging influences the progression of several age-related diseases in other tissues...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The number of adults over the age of 65 is predicted to triple in the next 40 years, and with that the incidence of age-related diseases is expected to increase sharply worldwide. Understanding the molecular basis of aging is critical to finding new methods for prevention and treatment of age-...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Over the past several decades, studies using model organisms have yielded insights into the basic biological mechanisms of aging. In particular, research with the roundworm C. elegans, aided by its short lifespan and easily manipulated genetics, has identified a number of pathways that regulate...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

A number of genetic studies in lower organisms have identified several pathways as key regulators of lifespan, stress response, and reproductive fitness, including the Insulin-PI3K-AKT-FoxO, target of rapamycin (TOR), and LKB1-AMPK pathways. All these longevity pathways are conserved in mammals...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

In the next 50 years, the world's population aged 60 and over will more than triple from 600 million to 2 billion and carries the risk of significant social and economic burden if healthy aging cannot be maintained. Current research on aging has largely focused the molecular mechanisms of age-...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Human cells undergo a process called cellular aging that limits the number of times they can divide, thereby setting the self-renewal capacity of human tissues. One measurement of a cell’s age is how often it has divided and how many cells it can still give rise to in the future. This...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The brain is a complex structure that intertwines neurons and glial cells. Evolution of the mammalian brain, in part, has been enabled by a class of glial cells, oligodendrocytes, which provide the myelin. Myelin sheaths wrap axons, the long, thin neuronal projections used to communicate with...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Dietary restriction and the modulation of nutrient-sensing pathways are robust and reproducible interventions that extend life/healthspan in model organisms. Accordingly, the mitochondrion, being the single most important metabolic organelle, receives much attention as a major contributor to...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Many human traits, including aging, have a strong genetic, or heritable, component. Despite the robustness of this observation, it has been incredibly difficult to identify the molecular causes for these differences. Genetic variants can have a very subtle affect on a phenotype, rather, the...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Recent advances in technologies for determining DNA sequences have revealed that every human genome contains small deletions, as well as mutations that abolish the function of one of two copies of tens of genes. Such mutations and deletions do not result in complete loss of function, but rather...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging results in a decline in the integrity and function of cells and tissues.  One reason for this decline is thought to be the inevitable accumulation of misfolded and damaged proteins with time accompanied by the collapse in the cells’ protective protein quality control mechanisms to deal...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), also known as heart attack, significantly increases with age, and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the population aged 65 years and older. The underlying pathology is typically loss of cardiomyocytes that leads to heart failure....  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Mitochondria produce the energy needed for cellular growth and activity. Decline in mitochondrial form and function are widely recognized but poorly understood features of aged cells, and key features of aging-related diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. My long-term goal is to identify...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Dietary restriction increases lifespan and slows aging-related decline in health across species. Altered control of gene expression at the level of protein synthesis has emerged as an important but ill-defined player in this process. The importance of understanding the connection between...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

As a function of age, the capacity for adult stem cells to self-renew declines.  Self- renewal, the ability of a stem cell to divide repeatedly, is crucial to perpetuate a pool of pluripotent cells that can differentiate to supplant cells that die during the lifespan of...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

Genome-wide hypomethylation of DNA is a near-universal feature of aging cells and has been proposed to be a major factor contributing to replicative senescence. However, a direct role for the gradual loss of methylation seen during an organism’s lifetime in the aging process has yet to be...  >> MORE

2013 New Scholar Award in Aging

The process of aging involves a progressive decline in physiology and function of our tissues. Current research suggests that we age, in part, due to reduced function of self-renewing stem cells that are required for tissue rejuvenation of many tissue types. Our understanding of why and how stem...  >> MORE