2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Tissues and cells are constantly bombarded by a complex array of environmental factors that can have deleterious effects on many critical cellular functions. The selective removal of damaged or otherwise non-functional proteins from the proteome is an essential task that is mediated by the...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Although aging is an immensely complicated process, one characteristic of aging is increased susceptibility to cancer, which can result from genetic instability. Our cells are exposed to DNA damaging agents daily, such as UV irradiation, and as we age the ability of our cells to repair these...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging was long thought to be a passive process that was the result of the accumulation of damage over time. In the last two decades, however, it has become apparent that organisms actively control their aging rate in response to environmental signals. In diverse organisms, such as worms, flies,...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a simple yet powerful eukaryotic model organism for aging research. A typical yeast cell replicates through budding of a daughter cell and can undergo 20-30 such replication events before senescence. While the life span of the mother cells...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Cognitive decline is a hallmark of the aging nervous system, characterized by increasing memory loss and a deterioration in mental acuity. In addition, neuronal damage and death are key features of the pathophysiology of age-related neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is associated with a decrease in the ability of cells to cope with environmental challenges. The decline in the capacity to respond stress is a major factor in the process of aging and senescence. This has been shown for various forms of stress such as heat shock, hypoxia and oxidative...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Neurons are highly specialized cells with very long projections called axons, which they use to communicate with one another. Neurons communicate with each other by transmitting signaling molecules. Some of these signaling molecules, and most of the machinery that stores and sends these signals...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Lysosomes are responsible for the turnover and clearance from cells of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Long-lived cells such as cardiomyocytes, retinal pigmented epithelial cells and neurons are particularly dependent of the efficient function of their lysosomes to prevent the...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

The Ghazi lab uses Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to understand the genetic mechanisms that influence how long animals live and how they age. We are particularly interested in the relationship between aging and reproduction, two fundamental aspects of our lives.

Traditionally...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Motor decline is one of most severe phenotypes in normal aging. As we get older, we move and respond slower, performing actions with less precision and more variance. The nigral dopaminergic system and the striatum, which are critically involved in action learning and motor control (as evidenced...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Understanding the genetic basis of human age-related diseases, as well as normal aging, such as cardiovascular changes, age-related neurodegenerative disease, autoimmune disease, and diabetes constitutes an important step towards unraveling disease pathogenesis and risk prediction. The...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is associated with gradual functional decline of many organs and systems within our bodies. The specific manifestations of aging vary among different tissues, and common biological mechanisms driving natural aging progression have not been established. We aim to examine a key aspect of...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Sestrins are stress-inducible proteins that are found in most animal species. Sestrins have several biochemical roles against oxidative damage and abnormal synthesis of proteins and lipids, which can contribute to the attenuation of aging. Recently, using Drosophila (fruit fly) model organism,...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging and reproduction are intrinsically linked. In one view, the rate of aging emerges due to evolutionary conflicts between assured reproduction earlier in life and the vagaries of random death. Population genetics offer hypotheses to explain why an intimate relationship between reproduction...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

The aging process is accompanied by changes in gene expression. While previous studies have focused primarily on gene expression levels and alternative splicing patterns, an important aspect of the transcriptome, RNA editing, has been largely neglected. RNA editing, when disrupted in model...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

The mechanisms which impact aging and aging-related diseases are complex and challenging to study. Systems-biology studies have mapped out aging-related genetic networks, but these top-down approaches are complicated by the difficulty of distinguishing correlations from causality. Genome-wide...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is a universal trait that is observed across the evolutionary spectrum. From a public health perspective, aging is also the critical risk factor for a variety of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, many forms of cancer and metabolic disease. However, although...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Faking Fasting Pharmacologically

Fasting, willingly abstaining from food intake, has been used throughout history as therapy for various conditions. In science fasting is often referred to as dietary restriction and is defined as reduced food-intake without malnutrition. For nearly...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is accompanied by changes in different brain regions and deficits in a constellation of cognitive functions. A fundamental challenge in our efforts to slow down age-related cognitive decline is to identify how alterations in different circuits of the brain contribute to impairments in...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Energy imbalance during aging associates with visceral adiposity and insulin resistance, the hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome is a major health problem that predicts reduced survival, and has a prevalence greater than 44% in individuals older than 50 years. The...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

While the benefits of calorie restriction (CR – reducing food provisions relative to ad libitum, “free choice” consumption) for metabolic/aging-related disease prevention and longevity promotion are well documented in multiple organisms, the molecular basis for these benefits is still debated....  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is associated with increased susceptibility to cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Over the past decade substantial advances have been made in aging research, reaching a consensus in the fact that dietary restriction (DR), and in particular...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

A hallmark of aging is a progressive loss of immune function that significantly impacts health and survival. Elderly individuals exhibit increased susceptibility to infections, such as those with influenza virus, that are relatively well-tolerated by younger populations. Moreover, the protective...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is a physiological phenomenon associated with significant changes in multiple organs, including hair graying, hearing and memory loss and reduced regeneration ability in the muscle and hematopoietic system. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for aging is imperative for improving the...  >> MORE

2012 New Scholar Award in Aging

The risk for most major neurodegenerative disorders, including many forms of dementia, drastically increases with aging. The ability to obtain neurons directly and non-invasively from human individuals of different age groups will offer opportunities to study intrinsic cellular properties...  >> MORE