2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Human aging is associated with a general decline of physiological functions, in particular the function of the nervous system. Older people have greater difficulties in controlling muscle movements and higher tendency of memory loss and cognitive impairments. Furthermore, age is the largest risk...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
The global molecular changes that change during aging remain relatively unknown. Cells often react to their environment by modulating, increasing or decreasing, the level of expression of specific genes. Recent studies suggest that older animals have very different patterns of gene expression...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
The key physiological characteristic of aging is a failure to maintain tissue integrity due to progressive deterioration, coupled to the apparent exhaustion of normal regenerative potential. This may be due to environmental factors, such as DNA damage, which eventually cannot be overcome, and/or...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Adult onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Huntington's disease, don't present clinical symptoms until late in life suggesting that the normal aging process plays an important role in determining when affected individuals begin to show disease symptoms....  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aberrant dopamine signaling has been linked to several neurological disorders, including the two most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Both are progressive neurodegenerative diseases with late onset. Combined, over 5.5 million...  >> MORE

2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Cellular senescence is a state in which cells permanently stop dividing. It occurs in response to cellular stresses, including DNA damage, and also due to shortening of chromosome ends (telomeres) caused by multiple rounds of cell division. Although senescence is believed to protect organisms...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
The human body is marked by interactions among individual cells, especially between neighboring cells. In young and healthy tissue, neighboring cells modify their internal structure and adhere to each other. This often leads to a collective change of cell morphology. Cell morphological change...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Human aging is associated by a progressive loss of tissue structure and function however, the cause of tissue degeneration remains poorly understood. One model that might partly explain the functional decline of various organ systems with increasing age is that cells essential for tissue function...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

Studies in model organisms such as C. elegans have provided significant insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying aging. The insulin-like daf-2 signaling pathway and dietary restriction regulate aging in C. elegans and other species. However, their downstream...  >> MORE

2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

In Parkinson's disease the death of dopaminergic neurons in the brain results in the progressive loss of control of body movement. An estimated 1% of the population aged 65 and older suffers from Parkinson's disease, making it the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. With this...  >> MORE

2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in model organisms including yeast, flies, worms and rodents. Changes in NAD+ metabolism and a family of conserved NAD+ -dependent protein-modifying enzymes called sirtuins are involved in mediating the longevity response to CR. The...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

A major problem during chronological aging is the accumulation of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules produced by mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Young cells are protected by a balanced activity of the mitochondria, efficient antioxidant and DNA repair systems, as...  >> MORE

2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
The enzyme telomerase, which replicates telomeres, is thought to be key to cellular immortality. Telomere shortening leads to cellular aging, a process that can be reversed by restoration of the telomeric structure. Meanwhile, up to 90% of human tumor cells show high levels of telomerase activity...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
This project will develop novel methods for causal inference utilizing multiple age-related phenotypes collected on a panel of mouse inbred stains across a range of ages at the Jackson Laboratory Integrative Center for Genetic Regulation of Aging. This unique study of mammalian aging will...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Aging is the single largest risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of death of individuals over the age of 65 years. Atherosclerosis is so common in older persons (at least one out of two persons over sixty five years of age has atherosclerosis) and it is thought that...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is characterized by a progressive deterioration of tissues and organs that is in part caused by the accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles with age. Recent studies suggest that excess or defective organelles and cytoplasmic components are recycled through the autophagy-lysosome...  >> MORE

2007 New Scholar Award in Aging
Aging is a complex process that occurs at both organismal and cellular levels. As cells age, DNA damage and mutations accumulate in the genome. Certain defects in DNA repair and telomere maintenance, such as those associated with Werner syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia, lead to premature aging...  >> MORE
2007 New Scholar Award in Aging

The nervous system is made up of two classes of cells: neurons and glia. Glia outnumber neurons in our nervous system and glia-neuron interactions are essential for synapse formation and stability. It is known that structural alteration and functional decline occur at synapses in both normal...  >> MORE