2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Decline in immune function is a hallmark of aging, leading to increased susceptibility to infections and reduced response to vaccination in the elderly population. Paradoxically this decline in immune function is associated with low grade chronic inflammation and increased incidence of diseases...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

The mitochondrial respiratory chain has multiple components (complexes I-V and coenzyme Q) that work intimately together to turn fuel (supplied by the metabolic breakdown of sugar, fat, and protein) into energy (in the form of ATP). It is also a site of production of free radicals, which are...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Proper organ development and maintenance is often accomplished through multiple cell types within a tissue that express distinct gene products and collectively support common functions. For example, the mammalian testis is composed of male germ cells (the gametes) and supporting somatic cells that...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Cognitive aging in humans is characterized by performance deficits in older adults that cross multiple domains, including attention, short-term memory and long-term memory. These deficits impact the ability of older individuals to lead productive, high-quality lives. The goal of my research is to...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Parkinsonís disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting over one million people in North America alone. It is characterized clinically by resting tremor, slowness of movement, postural instability, and muscle rigidity with these disabilities largely attributed to the extensive loss...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Adult mammalian neural stem cells are a subject of intense study based on their biological properties and potential medical significance. Neural stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into neurons and glial cells (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) during development and also in the adult...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Why do we age? Although no one knows for certain, there are many theories that offer potential explanations. One such theory is called the mitochondrial theory of aging. Mitochondria are small sub-cellular organelles that harvest energy for our bodies by combining the electrons from our digested...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is the major risk factor for a large number of diseases that exact a huge economic toll on society. A major advance in the field of aging came with the discovery that the lifespan of the flatworm, C. elegans, could be dramatically increased by genetic mutations in the receptor for...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

γ-Secretase has long been regarded as an attractive anti-amyloid therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, our studies demonstrated that mice with reduced levels of γ-secretase activity (Nct+/- mice and Nct+/-;PS1+/-...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

Mitochondria play a central role integrating cellular energetics and the control of cell survival. As a result they are a critical element in aging and many degenerative diseases. Our research focuses on identifying the role of in vivo mitochondrial dysfunction in degenerative diseases...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

Interlaced among the billions of neural cells in the human brain is an elaborate web of arteries, veins, and capillaries. Neural cells and vascular cells form a functionally integrated network that is collectively termed the neurovascular unit. The neurovascular unit regulates important...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
One hallmark of aging cells is a gradual decline in their ability to repair DNA damage, resulting in the accumulation of mutations and genomic rearrangements. Recent data indicate that the fidelity of DNA double-strand break repair may be particularly relevant to the aging process. In general,...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
The DNA damage theory of aging states that accumulation of DNA damage or chromosomal abnormalities over time can lead to decreasing cell function, and that the additive effects of such damage result in aging. This theory has been partially tested using mouse as an experimental system, where mouse...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
The ability to form and recall memories declines with age. We would like to understand the events within brain cells that take place and allow the formation of memories. If we can determine how memories are formed then we can understand how and where the process goes wrong when we age. Within...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Maintenance of the genome is critical for the survival and health of an organism. Genomic mutations and alterations promote cancer, and the incidence of cancer increases exponentially with age. My lab is investigating the mechanisms of genomic instability associated with aging and diseases...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging is associated with diminished cognitive function that can, in part, be explained by cellular changes in the mechanisms of neuronal plasticity. Degeneration in synaptic functions associated with learning and memory contributes to age-dependent pathologies including Alzheimer's disease,...  >> MORE

2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
My lab is interested in the link that exists between aging and reproduction. It has been observed that increased reproduction often leads to a decrease in lifespan and vice versa. One possible mechanism for this balance is the insulin/IGF-1 signaling cascade (ISC). It has been convincingly...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Alzheimer's disease is one of the most dreaded and common causes of dementia in elderly humans. Recent clinical evidence has identified disease and dysfunction in small blood vessels in the brain as being intimately linked to the development and severity of Alzheimer's disease. It remains unclear,...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Eastern grey squirrel is one of the longest-lived rodents. Its maximum documented lifespan is 23 years, which is almost 10 times longer than that of a mouse. Since squirrel is related to classical short-lived laboratory rodents such as mouse and rat, squirrel is an ideal model organism to...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
The large increase in human life expectancy during the last century has been accompanied by a significant increase in the incidence of aging diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is now the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly in Western societies. Recent...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Our lab studies the basic mechanisms of transcriptional regulationówhat turns gene expression ìon or offî in human cells. A major aspect of our work involves a protein known as p53, which works primarily by triggering changes in gene expression patterns in response to specific cellular cues. Many...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
The over-65s account for a major portion of all health care costs. Aging renders this group especially susceptible to infections and current concerns about avian influenza virus and the increased severity of SARS and West Nile Virus in the elderly have highlighted this issue. Declining immune...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Adult neural stem cells are brain-specific somatic stem cells that localize to interfaces with the vasculature within proliferative clusters comprised of neuronal, glial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This concentration of newly-formed cells and vascular structures define the extracellular...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
Aging is a complex process controlled by various genetic elements and environmental factors. It is characterized by a combination of deteriorative processes after a period of development of an organism. In mammals, extensive cell proliferation and tissue repair in adult organisms are required to...  >> MORE
2006 New Scholar Award in Aging
One of the hallmarks of the aging process is the decline of learning and memory functions evidenced by slower learning and faster forgetting. Since alterations in synaptic modifications (long-term potentiation or long-term depression) have been observed in the aged animals, deficits may exist in...  >> MORE