2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2005 New Scholar Award in Aging
One of the traits of aging is a decline in the ability of organ stem cells to repair damaged, differentiated tissues. Adult skeletal muscle is a perfect example of a tissue that robustly regenerates throughout adult life but fails to do so in old age. The reason for this decline in the tissue...  >> MORE
2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

Adult somatic stem cells are unspecialized cells that renew themselves for a long period of time, but under certain physiological or experimental conditions, they differentiate through progenitor cells into cells with tissue specific function. Hematopoietic stem cells, which reside in the bone...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

To understand the complex processes underlying human aging, the study of cellular "senescence" may recapitulate some aspects. Senescence is a cell fate program that can be triggered by environmental stimuli and stress. We have recently discovered that the major stress-inducible transcription...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging
We have uncovered the complement factor H (CFH) being a major gene for Caucasian patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). At present, little is known about differences in genetic risk factors contributing to AMD among various ethnic backgrounds. Are the specific clinical feature...  >> MORE
2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging and stress response are both among the most universal of biological processes. Heat-shock Transcription Factor (HSF) is the master regulator of the heat-shock response, a fundamental cellular defensive mechanism against the deleterious effects of various stresses by rapidly expressing a...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

Loss of tissue and organ function is a characteristic of organismal aging, and such changes have been attributed to decreases in stem cell function. Stem cells are the building blocks during development of organisms as varied as plants and humans. In addition, stem cells provide for the...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

Dietary restriction (DR) is the most robust environmental method of lifespan extension in species as diverse as yeast, worms, fruit flies and rodents. DR is customarily applied by reducing the total amount of food intake, and the individual contribution of each food constituent to the longevity...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

We use the free-living soil worm C. elegans as a genetic model system to study the genes that affect longevity. For the many genes that act in the worm, their counterparts in human also have similar functions; we therefore hope that our research in C. elegans will allow us to find...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging
The DNA making up the genetic code in our cells is continuously damaged and repaired. The consequences of not repairing DNA damage are revealed by inherited genetic disorders in which DNA repair pathways are disrupted. In these disorders, there can be either a profound increase in cancer risk or...  >> MORE
2005 New Scholar Award in Aging
Expression of the tumor suppressor, p16INK4a, increases with age. While this protein prevents cancer in many tissues by inducing senescence, p16INK4a appears also to contribute to aging. To elucidate the links between aging and senescence, we will evaluate p16INK4a...  >> MORE
2005 New Scholar Award in Aging

Misfolded transmembrane and secretory proteins are a feature of several age-associated diseases. The translocation of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and folding are mediated by the translocon and ER chaperones. Oxidative damage of some chaperones in aged tissues suggests folding...  >> MORE

2005 New Scholar Award in Aging
The main focus of our laboratory is to understand the biological bases of association between poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and an organism development and longevity. Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (pADPr) levels are determined by the relative activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and tankyrase...  >> MORE