2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

Telomeres are protein-DNA structures that prevent the termini of chromosomes from being recognized as DNA damage-induced chromosome breaks. Telomere maintenance has been proposed to play a central role in human aging by limiting the replicative potential of somatic cell populations and...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

While aging has long been recognized as an interesting phenomenon, it is only recently that it has become the subject of genetic analysis. This principally derives from the observation that single gene mutations in yeast, worms, flies and mice can markedly increase the life span of these...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

The decline in energy with age highlights energy metabolism and the role of mitochondria in aging. Aged cells accumulate oxidative DNA damage that is likely to be responsible for the observed increase in mutations, particularly in the mitochondrial genome. The major source of reactive oxygen...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging
Synaptic stability is likely to be critical for long term information storage and normal memory function. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), synapses have been shown to be one of the earliest neuronal structures to be affected and their loss could be a very important factor in the cognitive decline...  >> MORE
2004 New Scholar Award in Aging
Caloric restriction (CR) is the most effective intervention known to extend life span in a variety of species including mammals. CR has also been shown to delay the onset or reduce the incidence of many age-related diseases. For example CR suppresses the carcinogenic effect of several classes of...  >> MORE
2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

It is generally assumed that the generation of neurons ceases before or soon after birth, and consequently, that neurons are not replaced in the brain of adult animals. According to this view, neurons are long-lived, such that their synaptic connections are able to encode information over long...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

Immunosenescence is the deterioration of immune function that accompanies aging and that contributes to age-dependent increases in infection, mortality, and potentially cancer. Dietary restriction is a manipulation whereby exposing experimental animals to a reduced-calorie environment extends...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

Glucose homeostasis is highly dysregulated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes as well as in dietary manipulations such as caloric restriction. Caloric restriction is a dietary regimen low in calories that extends life span, but the mechanisms by which dietary caloric restriction...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

One strategy for moderating detrimental effects of aging is to commandeer hormonal pathways that coordinate aging in different tissues. The first obstacle to this goal is identifying such "longevity hormones". Among the many remarkable discoveries from the roundworm, Caenorhabditis...  >> MORE

2004 New Scholar Award in Aging

Accumulation of DNA damage and loss of telomere protection contribute significantly to the aging process. The Nbs1, Mre11 and Rad50 complex (NMR) plays an important role in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and telomere maintenance. Two components of this complex, Nbs1 and Mre11, are mutated...  >> MORE