2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

Germ cells can be passed from one generation to the next, indefinitely. Therefore, the germline has the potential to proliferate indefinitely and is an immortal cell lineage. In contrast, somatic cells are only needed for a single generation, and biological theory predicts that the germline may...  >> MORE

2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) degeneration initiates AMD. Oxidative stress has been suggested for RPE aging/degeneration. However, corneal epithelilal cells (CE) rarely suffer from...  >> MORE

2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

Aging cells and tissues accumulate point mutations and genomic rearrangements, consistent with a failing ability to defend their genomes against DNA damage. Rearrangements result primarily from errors in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs), which arise commonly by breakage of replication forks...  >> MORE

2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

Epigenetic alteration in gene expression is one of the postulated mechanisms underlying aging, as well as oxidative lesions by reactive oxygen species, genomic instability by accumulated DNA damages, telomere shortening in proliferating cells, and accumulation of glycation end products of...  >> MORE

2003 New Scholar Award in Aging
Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer a number of advantages for studying biological and biomedical science. Because embryonic development is external to the mother and the embryos are transparent, zebrafish were initially used as a model system for developmental biology. Recently, zebrafish have...  >> MORE
2003 New Scholar Award in Aging
Prion diseases belong to a large group of neurodegenerative disorders occurring in the elderly, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Like other neurodegenerative disorders, prion disease can be manifested as a sporadic or inherited disease. However, prion diseases can also be...  >> MORE
2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

In Alzheimer's disease, a chronic inflammatory response to β-amyloid has been proposed to underly neuro-degenerative pathology. Central to this hypothesis is the observation that microglia are recruited to, and accumulate at, sites of β-amyloid deposition. These cells produce...  >> MORE

2003 New Scholar Award in Aging
While most cells in the hematopoietic system have a limited lifespan, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the unique ability to live indefinitely through self-renewal. Self-renewal enables HSCs, and indeed all stem cells, to maintain throughout the lifetime of an organism a pool of...  >> MORE
2003 New Scholar Award in Aging

Lifespan is determined by variables in both the genetic and environmental dimensions. It appears, that in natural aging populations of animals, a number of genetic loci, some independent, others as interdependent pairs or even sets, contribute to the genetic lifespan potential of a given...  >> MORE