2002 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
The overall goal of this study is to isolate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations associated with aging, to analyze the accumulation of the mutations during aging and to determine the genetic and functional consequences of the age-dependent mtDNA mutations in mouse. In mammalian cells, over 90% of...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
Chemical genetics relies on using small, cell-permeable molecules that interact with proteins and create a loss or a gain of function of proteins similarly to genetic mutations. The active compounds are obtained by the in vivo screening of libraries of chemicals for the desired cellular phenotype,...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
A common feature of aging is the accumulation of abnormal or damaged proteins inside cells with a consequent negative effect in cell function. Any attempt to remove these abnormal proteins may help in the functional recovery of different organs affected in aged organisms. Damaged or abnormal...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging

Human gamma-secretase is a large membrane protein complex catalyzing a novel reaction of intramembrane proteolysis. This activity is important in a number of cellular signaling pathways. There are three known gamma-secretase components, presenilin, nicastrin and beta-catenin. Mutations in...  >> MORE

2002 New Scholar Award in Aging

Progressive loss of neurons in the brain is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. The only known risk factor for the majority of such patients is aging. Nonetheless, most people do not develop these disorders during aging, so other...  >> MORE

2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia and one of the most serious health problems in the U.S. Most cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) are caused by mutations in two related genes, known as presenilin 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2). Deciphering the...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
The skin undergoes significant structural and functional changes with aging, secondary to both intrinsic and environmental factors. The epidermis and dermis become thinner, lose their normal rete pattern, exhibit decreased elasticity and show a decreased number of melanocytes. The hair becomes...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has served as a valuable model-organism for the study of aging and was the first organism possessing a circulatory system to have its genome completely sequenced. Little is known, however, about...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
Our research focuses on the effects of genetic and environmental factors on brain function in experimental mouse models of human neurological diseases. Routinely, we use a combination of behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neurochemical...  >> MORE
2002 New Scholar Award in Aging
Dietary restriction (DR, also referred to as calorie restriction, food restriction, and energy restriction) is the best-studied method of retarding senescence and mortality in mammals ñ extending life span by as much as 50% in rodents. Understanding the molecular mechanism by which DR extends life...  >> MORE