2001 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
In vitro cellular senescence, since its first description in the literature, has been put forward as a model for aging in species with mitotically active tissues. Evidence suggests that sub-lethal levels of DNA damage, including telomere loss, induce the cellular senescence phenotype in normal...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging

Genetic studies of human progeric syndromes have enhanced our understanding the molecular mechanisms of the aging process. Werner Syndrome (WS) is the segmental progeria considered to be most similar to natural senescence. WS fibroblasts display premature replicative senescence in culture and...  >> MORE

2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
Normal aging is associated with selective changes in cognition that are attributable, in part, to a decline in hippocampal-dependent memory and changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Indeed, altered hippocampal synaptic function provides one of the primary electrophysiological markers for...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
There is growing evidence that the molecular mechanisms that underlie the sculpting of neuronal networks during development also apply to aspects of adult neuronal plasticity and repair. Several families of molecules that regulate axonal pathfinding in the developing nervous system have been...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging

Recent studies have demonstrated that neural stem cells exist in the adult nervous system of both lower vertebrates and phylogenetically higher mammalian organisms, including humans. These findings raise the possibility that new neurons continue to be produced naturally in the adult brain even...  >> MORE

2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
Aging is a common phenomenon shared by animals and plants, but our understanding of why and how we age remains limited. It would be of great biological interest and practical importance if we could gain insights into the molecular basis of aging, learn to delay the aging process, and maintain the...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
Sarcopenia, progressive loss of muscle mass and quality, is the principle component of the profound changes in body composition that occur with aging, and it is a large factor in loss of strength, deficits in gait, and reduced metabolic rate in the elderly. We will apply two novel methods to...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging

Neurodegenerative diseases share many molecular and pathological similarities, yet no unifying explanation exists to explain how and why they arise. We propose that defects in a novel biological system underlie development of these disorders, and will test this hypothesis by investigating a...  >> MORE

2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
Belying the complexity of the aging process, relatively minor changes to the environment or genetic make-up of an organism can dramatically slow the rate at which it ages. The question thus arises: How can seemingly simple changes have such profound effects on aging? Recent findings suggest that...  >> MORE
2001 New Scholar Award in Aging
The formation and maintenance of memories is one of the brain's most intriguing functions. The human brain has the remarkable ability to store and retrieve past experiences for years and in some instances decades. Changes in memory occur with age and there is increasing evidence that there is a...  >> MORE