2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

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2000 New Scholar Award in Aging
The incidence of ischemic heart disease increases with advancing age. Unfortunately, the physiologic response to cardiac myocardial ischemia, the angiogenic development of new blood vessels, is decreased in the elderly population as demonstrated by both clinical and experimental studies.

The...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

The adapter protein Shc, which couples mitogenic signals from cell surface receptors through the Ras/MAPK pathway, has recently been implicated as a determinant of mammalian longevity, as mice harboring a targeted knockout of p66shc live 30% longer than control littermates. In...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging
Changes in synaptic structure are not just a developmental phenomenon but take place throughout the lifetime of the nervous system. While synaptic rearrangements are likely to play pivotal roles in long-term memory and functional recovery after nerve injury, loss of synapses in the elderly has...  >> MORE
2000 New Scholar Award in Aging
In vivo analysis of the role of tau in neurodegeneration  >> MORE
2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

Throughout life, our DNA is constantly subject to damage from both environmental agents and endogenous reactive oxygen species. Due to incomplete repair of this damage, changes in DNA accumulate in each cell as time passes. Such changes (mutations) are known to have a role in the etiology of...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

Genome instability has long been proposed to be a major factor in the aging process. The contribution of genome instability to aging is underscored by the finding that several of the segmental progeroid syndromes, which are characterized by early onset of conditions normally associated with...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

The majority of patients with cancer in the United States are more than 70 years old and cancer has been regarded as a disease of aging. Aging-related decline of the immune response has also been well documented. Our long-term goals are to identify molecular targets for drug development...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging
Mitochondria are the organelles within cells that are responsible for generating much of the required energy for cell survival. Mitochondria have their own DNA (mtDNA) which encodes some of the necessary proteins to carry out these biochemical reactions. Recently, there has been an increased...  >> MORE
2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

One major advance in the study of mammalian aging was the discovery made by Hayflick in the 1960's. He observed that normal human cells had a finite lifespan in vitro and could execute only a limited number of cell divisions. Beyond this limit, cells undergo an irreversible growth arrest...  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

Senescence is the result of deteriorated somatic function that leads to age-dependent increase of mortality rate. Senescence is not an evolutionary adaptation, but its rate of progress can be subject to adaptive selection, as must be the case given ubiquitous species variation for longevity....  >> MORE

2000 New Scholar Award in Aging
Memory is crucial for many aspects of human behavior, from day-to-day behaviors, such as remembering to take medications, to more fundamental cognitive abilities, such as reasoning and problem solving. The centrality of memory for these and other cognitive behaviors is too often painfully evident...  >> MORE
2000 New Scholar Award in Aging

The transgenic and gene knockout technology has proved to be a powerful system to elucidate in vivo functions of target genes and to establish mouse models of human diseases. However, the conventional approach introduces modifications in mouse germline, which may lead to adverse effects...  >> MORE